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Faculty - Margo Lukens

Margo Lukens

Address:

Margaret Lukens
Associate Professor of English
Director of Academic Programs, Innovation Engineering
108 Foster Center for Student Innovation
Orono, Maine 04469-5798 U.S.A.
Office Telephone: (207) 581-1401

E-mail: margaret.lukens@umit.maine.edu

Office Hours

Wednesdays 9:00-11:00am and by appointment at Foster Student Innovations Center.

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS

Native American and mixed blood writers; Wabanaki literary and storytelling history; Native American and First Nations plays and playwrights; innovation and antiracism work.

EDUCATION

Ph.D. in English, August, 1991 – University of Colorado, Boulder Dissertation: “Creating Cultural Spaces: The Pluralist Project of American Women Writers, 1843-1902.”  Director: Cordelia Candelar

M.A. in English, December, 1986 – University of Colorado, Boulder Master’s thesis: “The Cowboy Hero as Androgyne and Poet: A New Reading of an American Archetype”

A.B. cum laude, June, 1977 – Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Major: English and American Literature and Language

PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS

Director of Academic Programs, Foster Innovation Center, University of Maine, Orono, ME, July 2007-present

Faculty Associate, Centre Franco-americain, Universite de Maine, Orono, ME May 2007-present

Chair of English, University of Maine. Orono, ME September 2004-August 2007

Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies in English, University of Maine, Orono, ME September 1999-September 2004.

Associate professor, University of Maine, Orono, ME September 1998-present.

Assistant professor, University of Maine, Orono, ME August 1992-August 1998.

Assistant professor, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA September 1991-August 1992.

COURSES TAUGHT

Graduate

ENG 542: Studies in Multicultural American Literature
ENG 529: Studies in Literature – American Romantics

Undergraduate

ENG 496: Field Experience in Professional Writing
ENG 443: The American Romantics
ENG 442: Native American Literature
ENG 429: Topics in Literature – Staging Intertribal Theater
ENG 241: American Literature Survey 1 – From the Beginnings to the Romantics
ENG 206: Descriptive/ Narrative Writing
ENG 101: College Composition

EDITED BOOK

“Grandchildren of the Buffalo Soldiers and other untold stories: five plays by William S. Yellow Robe, Jr.,” introduction & notes, forthcoming from UCLA American Indian Studies.

BOOK CHAPTERS (selected)

“Two Worlds on One Stage: working in collaboration to prevent encroachment, appropriation, and other maddening forms of imperialism—and to create a shared critical voice”—a focused critical interview/essay with William S. Yellow Robe, Jr. for American Indian Performing Arts: Critical Directions (Anthology ed. Jaye Darby—forthcoming from UCLA).

“The American Indian Story of Zitkala-Sa.”  In Her Own Voice: Nineteenth-Century American Women Essayists, ed. Sherry Lee Linkon.  New York: Garland Publishing, 1997.  141-55.

“Columnist of Conscience: Margaret Fuller’s New York Years.” in Margaret Fuller: Visionary of the New Age, ed. Marie Urbanski.  Orono: Northern Lights Press, 1994.  183-96.

JOURNAL ARTICLES  (selected)

“‘A Being of a New World:’ The Ambiguity of Mixed Blood in Pauline Johnson’s ‘My Mother.’”  MELUS (Multi Ethnic Literatures of the United States) 27 (3), Fall 2002.  43-56.

“Her ‘Wrongs and Claims:’ Sarah Winnemucca’s Strategic Narratives of Abuse.”  Wicazo-Sa Review 13 (1), Spring 1998.  93-108.

“Mourning Dove and Mixed Blood: Cultural and Historical Pressures on Aesthetic Choice and Authorial Identity.”  American Indian Quarterly 21 (3), Summer 1997.  409-22.

“‘I am from Mohegan! I am not Pequot!’: Cultural Survival in the Diary of Fidelia Fielding.”  D’Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian, The Construction of Gender and the Experience of Women in American Indian Societies.  Occasional Papers in Curriculum Ser.  20.  Chicago: Newberry Library, 1996.  243-57.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS  (selected)

“Native American Literature.”  Oxford Companion to American Literature ed. Jay Parini.  Vol. 3 of 4.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

“Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Simmons Bonnin).”  Native American Writers of the United States, ed. Kenneth M. Roemer.  Vol. 175 of Dictionary of Literary Biography. Detroit: Gale Research, 1997.  331-36.

“Paula Gunn Allen,” “Ethnopoetics,” “Diane Glancy,” “Estela Portillo-Trambley,” “Vickie L. Sears,” “Leslie Marmon Silko,”  “Anna Lee Walters,” “Sarah Winnemucca.”  The Oxford Companion to Women’s Writing in the United States, eds. Cathy N. Davidson and Linda Wagner-Martin.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

REVIEWS  (recent)

Rev. of Injun Joe’s Ghost: The Indian Mixed Blood in American Writing by Harry J. Brown, 2004.  American Indian Culture and Research Journal  29.2 (UCLA, 2005).

Review essay: Dreams and Thunder: Stories, Poems, and The Sun Dance Opera by Zitkala-Sa.  Edited with introduction by P. Jane Hafen, 2001; Native American Women’s Writing 1800-1924, an Anthology, edited with introduction by Karen L. Kilcup, 2000; Sarah Winnemucca by Sally Zanjani, 2001.  Legacy 19.2 (2002).

UNDER CONSIDERATION

Creating Cultural Spaces: The Pluralist Project of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century American Women Writers, under consideration at University of Nevada Press.

“Nanabush and the Weendigo: Native Resistance to Tragedy in Tomson Highway’s Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing,” under revision at the request of North Dakota Quarterly.

IN PROGRESS

The Invisible Anger of Franco-American Men: Robert Cormier’s Fade “The Triumph of Romance in Cogewea and Naturally Native” “Historical and Contemporary Wabanaki authorship” “Developing Intertribal Theater in the Dawnland”

GRANTS (selected)

NCIIA Curriculm Development grant for Innovation Engineering™course development, funded May 2008.

Seminar participant, funded by NEH, in a focus grant on Franco American Studies at the University of Maine.  Spring 2004.

University of Maine Diversity Across the Curriculum Grant: “Reading Plays by Native American and First Nations Authors.”  Summer 2001.

University of Maine Faculty Summer Research Fund Award: “Documenting Wabanaki Writers and Storytellers.”  Summer 1999.

Women in the Curriculum Grant: “Native American Women Writers and Storytellers.”  University of Maine, Summer 1996.

Seminar participant, funded by NEH, in “Construction of Gender and Women’s Experience in American Indian Societies” at the D’Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian, Newberry Library, Chicago, IL, January 8-13, 1996.

Franco-American Center Grant: “Metissage/Mestizaje: Entering the Half-Blood Zone.” University of Maine, Summer 1994.

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CONFERENCE PAPERS  (selected)

“Intertribal Thespians: the development of community theatre from Indian Island, Maine” presented with Marcia Douglas at Native American Literature Symposium, March 10, 2007, Saginaw, MI

“Deer Noise: Listening for Stage Directions in Diane Glancy’s The Woman Who Was a Red Deer Dressed for the Deer Dance” presented at University of Maine English Department Graduate Symposium, May 2006, Orono, ME

“Young Wabanaki Writers” co-presented with Kathleen Paul (Penobscot) at fourth annual Native American Literature Symposium, March 22, 2003, Prior Lake, MN

“‘someone else’s book?’”: Reading Native American Stories Written in English” presented at the third annual Native American Literature Symposium, April 2002, Prior Lake, MN

“‘Those Moosehide Pants:’ Henry Red Eagle’s Maliseet Performances” presented at the Southwest/Texas American Culture Association/Popular Culture Association annual meeting, March 10, 2001, Albuquerque, NM

“Wabanaki Literary History: Writers and Storyteller of the Past Century” presented at the American Literature Association Native American Literature Symposium, November 13, 1999, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

“‘white man jumped their claim:’ Gertrude Bonnin’s Search for Sarah Winnemucca’s Legacy” presented at annual meeting of the Western Literature Association, October 17, 1998, Banff, Alberta, Canada

“E. Pauline Johnson: ‘A Being of a New World’” presented at biennial meeting of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, November 20, 1997, Minneapolis, MN

“Her ‘Wrongs and Claims’: Sarah Winnemucca’s Exposure of Abuse” presented at American Literature Association annual meeting, May 23, 1997, Baltimore, MD

“Reading and Writing Metissage: Daring to Teach (and Take) a Course in Mixed-Blood Literature.”  Presentation with students at the Colloquium on Cultural Identity in French America: Legacy, Evolution, and the Challenges of Renewal, May 25, 1996, Bar Harbor, ME

“Humor and Renewal in Tomson Highway’s Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing” presented at biennial meeting of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, November 18, 1995, Seattle, WA

“‘A Being of A New World’: Heroic Mixed-Blood Characters in Native Women’s Fiction.”  Accepted for presentation at Other Voices: Fifth National American Women Writers of Color Conference, October 6, 1995, Ocean City, MD

“Both Sides of the Border: The Representations of Pauline Johnson and Zitkala-Sa.”  Presented at annual meeting of the American Culture Association/Popular Culture Association, April 15, 1995, Philadelphia, PA

“Mourning Dove and Metissage: Cultural and Historical Pressures on Aesthetic Choice and Authorial Identity.”  Presented at biennial meeting of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, November 19, 1993, New Orleans, LA

RELATED PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Directed production of The Woman Who Was a Red Deer Dressed for the Deer Dance by Diane Glancy (Cherokee) at Cyrus Pavilion Theatre, University of Maine.  April 2006.

Directed production of The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde at Orono Community Theatre, Orono, ME.  April 2005

Produced Better-n-Indins by William S. Yellow Robe, Jr., at Cyrus Pavilion Theatre, University of Maine.  November 2004

Directed reader’s theater performances of The Rez Sisters by Tomson Highway (Cree) at Indian Island Community Center (Penobscot Nation) and Glickman Library, University of Southern Maine.  April 2 and 22, 2004, and for School of Performing Arts Reader’s Theatre series, Minsky Recital Hall, University of Maine.  November 12, 2003.

Directed reader’s theater performance of scenes from The Independence of Eddie Rose by William S. Yellow Robe, Jr. for Domestic Violence Awareness event at Indian Island Community Center, Penobscot Nation.  October 16, 2003.

Taught Native American literature in Changing Lives through Literature, a program in cooperation with the Penobscot Nation Tribal Court experimenting with alternate sentencing for criminals.  Summer 1998.


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